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Angelica Tree Fact Sheet

Family:  Araliaceae - Ginseng family
Latin name:  Aralia elata
Common name:  Angelica Tree
Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree whole plant/habit, Photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree leaf, Photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of large compound leaf of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, Photo taken July 5, 2004. Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo of large compound leaf with ruler to give some indication of size, Photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, close up of compound leaf showing prickle with each leaflet pair, Photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, close up of base of petiole of compound leaf, photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, close up of base of petiole of compound leaf, photo taken July 5, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, plant was removed shortly before this photo was taken, photo taken August 13, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, tree stump, photo taken August 13, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 13, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 13, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken August 21, 2004. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken April 16, 2005. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, buds beginning to open, photo taken April 16, 2005. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, emerging leaves, photo taken April 16, 2005. Photo of Aralia elata - Angelica Tree, photo taken April 16, 2005.

A distinguishing feature of the Aralia elata, is the presence of spikes which is reminiscent of Kalopanax pictus - Castor-leaved aralia which is also members of the Ginseng family
Japanese Angelica-Tree

Plant description below from

http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs/midatlantic/plants-to-watch.htm

Japanese angelica tree is a deciduous shrub or small tree native to China, Korea, Japan and the Russian Federation. It occurs in Ontario, Canada and throughout much of the northeastern U.S. from New Hampshire south to Maryland and west to Michigan and Illinois. It also occurs in Oregon and Washington. It can grow to 30 ft. in height. It has prickly stems and large compound leaves that are 2 or 3 times pinnate. The leaf stalks and flower stalks may have prickles. The main lateral veins of the leaflets continue all the way to the teeth at the leaflet margin. Flowering occurs late July through August and fruits mature in August and September. Flowers are small and white and emerge from tips of stems in broad umbels 1-2 ft. across that lack a central stalk. Fruits are black and about 1/10 in. across. Angelica-tree is becoming increasingly common in the mid-Atlantic and should be watched and controlled as needed.

 

Related Plant Profile;

Aralia spinosa

The following info, may be helpful in deciding between Aralia spinosa and Aralia elata.

Reference: New York Botanical Garden Mistaken Identity - Invasive Plants and their Native Look-Alikes

Aralia spinosa Aralia elata
Main lateral veins branching and diminishin in size before reaching the leaf margin (smaller branching veins may run to the tips of teeth) Main lateral veins running all the way to the tips of teeth at the leaf margin
Inflorescence longer, often 1-1.2 m long, with a distinct central axis (typically longer than wide, base usually elevated above foliage) Inflorescence shorter, typically 30-60 cm long, and without a distinct central axis (often wider than long, with base usually surrounded by and even overtopped by foliage)

 

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Karren Wcisel © copyright 2004 - 2013

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Please ask for permission before using my photographs. Larger sizes and additional photographs of the tree are often available.

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